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Category: News


Nordica USA Recalls to Repair Skis; Binding Plates Can Break, Poses Fall Hazard to Skiers

Firm’s Recall Hotline: (800) 892-2668

CPSC Recall Hotline: (800) 638-2772

CPSC Media Contact: (301) 504-7908

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, in cooperation with the firm named below, today announced a voluntary recall of the following consumer product. Consumers should stop using recalled products immediately unless otherwise instructed. (To access color photos of the following recalled products, see CPSC’s Web site at www.cpsc.gov.)

 

Name of Product: XBi ALU Skis

Units: About 4,500 pairs

Distributor: Nordica USA, of West Lebanon, N.H.

Hazard: The binding could crack or break, causing the skier to lose control or fall and suffer injuries.

Incidents/Injuries: None reported.

Description and Models: This recall involves the XBi binding component which has been utilized on the following Nordica ski models and model years:

 

Year

Series

2006

MACH3POWER

2007

DOBSPIT

2007

MACH3POWER

2007

MACH3

2007

MACH2

2007

HELLCAT

2007

FIREFOX

2007

DOBPROSL

2008

FIREFOX

2008

DOBPROSL

2008

DOBPROGS

 

 

 

Sold by: Ski retailers nationwide from August 2006 through December 2008 for between $800 and $1,500.

Manufactured in: Italy

Remedy: Consumers should stop using the recalled skis immediately and return them to the retailer for a free replacement binding plate.

Consumer Contact: For additional information, contact Nordica USA at (800) 892-2668 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday, email the company at info@nordicausa.com, or visit the company’s Web site at www.nordicausa.com.

 

If you believe that you have a pair of Nordica skis that appear on the list above you should bring them into the nearest ski shop to have the binding plates replaced. You should call the shop in advance to see if they have the plates in stock, this is especially a good idea considering that Nordica has not sent any replacement plates to us yet. But there is no point in waiting till winter to get this done. Please remember to bring your boots in with the skis so that the bindings can be adjusted and tested after the new plates are installed. Nordica makes excellent products and it is to their credit they have initiated this voluntary recall to make certain that their customers continue to enjoy their Nordica skis and stay as safe as possible.

For our Arizona customers click here for Ski Pro locations.

 

 

Campus Rail Jam Tour at ASU Tempe, AZ 2/13/09. Brought to you by SKIPRO

Check out these other great blogs:

http://www.skipro.com/blog/

http://www.dealerskate.com/blog/

 

 
JAMACIA SKI TEAM, AN ARMY OF ONE

                                jamaica-ski-team4                                By way of: Jamaica Ski Team         

By way of: Spyder

By way of: Alpine Meadows

 

The Jamacia Ski Team is Errol Kerr. Born of a Jamaican father and American mother, Kerr was groomed for competition on the Squaw Valley race program. Since his childhood, his love of the Caribbean island spawned dreams of representing Jamaica in international competition. As Kerr’s alpine race skills grew, he realized the sport may be the avenue to fulfill his dream of wining an Olympic medal at the 2010 games.

 

If this all sounds a little far fetched consider Kerr’s recent record: 5th place finish at the Winter X Games skier cross event was in addition to an 8th and 12th place finish at FIS World Cup in Europe; 5th and two 6th place finishes on the Jeep King of the Mountain tour and a 6th and 8th place finish at the North American (NORAM) Cup at Big Mountain, Montana – where he competed in the downhill and super giant slalom disciplines.

 

Kerr’s primary focus for the Olympics will likely be the newest ski discipline “skier cross”, but he will probably compete in multiple events. There are few skiers who have the talent and the skills to be competitive in multiple alpine ski events but Kerr’s coach former U.S. Olympic coach, Raul Guisado, who will train Kerr for the Games, is convinced that Kerr has what it takes to be a medal contender.

 

Spyder skiwear also sees a great potential in Kerr. Phil Shettig, Spyder’s Director of Product, spearheaded the relationship with Kerr. “The opportunity for Spyder to work with Errol Kerr and the Jamaica Ski Team is awesome,” Shettig said. “Errol’s drive to make his dream reality fits in perfectly with Spyder and our Speedfreaks team grass roots ski racing initiative”.

 

The Jamaican’s do have a history of winter Olympic competition that began with the Jamaican four man Bobsled team that debuted at the 1988 Winter Olympics in Calgary, Alberta. That team did not take home a medal in those games but they did become a fan favorite and did go on to see some success in competition around the world including a 14th place finish at the 1994 Olympics finishing ahead of the United States, Russia, France and Italy.

 

 

By way of: First Tracks

By way of: Ski Racing

 

French ski maker Rossignol has announced  that Tim Petrick has been hired as the company’s Vice President of Global Sales and Marketing, effective July 1.

Petrick will oversee “worldwide strategic direction of the Dynastar, Lange, Look and Rossignol brands,” from the company’s headquarters in Moirans, France.

 

“This exciting news is an important step in the re-alignment of the Rossignol Group to become a stronger, more focused, more profitable winter-equipment company,” said CEO, Bruno Cercley. “I chose to hire Tim because he brings incredible passion as well as proven sales, marketing and brand-management experience. His input will strengthen all of our brands, improve our product planning and deliver more value to the Rossignol Group’s retailers and consumers around the world.”

 

Petrick comes to Rossignol after serving as K2’s Vice President of Global Sales. He has worked in the ski industry for more than 35 years as a 3-time member of the Professional Ski Instructors of America National Alpine Demo Team, Director and head coach of the Aspen Ski Club, Associate Publisher of Powder Magazine, General Manager of Olin Skis and Executive Vice President of Booth Creek Ski Holdings. Petrick has also written two books on the sport of skiing and is a published sports photographer.

 

I think this move by Rossignol is a great idea and long over due. Tim Petrick will bring the type of high energy and focused marketing that will appeal to the U S customer, which is a concept that many of the European ski companies do not take as seriously as they should. This should signal the development of some new products that  may serve to bring back some of the excitement and energy that Rossignol will need to make a run at regaining much of it’s market share that has been lost to the likes of  U S ski maker K2..

 

 

US SUPREME COURT RULES IN FAVOR OF SNOWMAKING!

 

By way of: www.arizonasnowbowl.com

By way of: www.savethepeaks.org

By way of: www.firsttracksonline.com

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Ok so they did not exactly rule in favor of snowmaking, but what the U.S. Supreme Court did do was to refused to review a ruling by the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco in favor of Arizona Snowbowl outside of Flagstaff, affirming a U.S. Forest Service decision to allow the ski area to make snow for the first time in its 71-year history.

 

The Snowbowl which is located just outside of Flagstaff Arizona began life in the 1930s when the forest service allowed the construction of a ski lodge and access road on the western slopes of the San Francisco Peaks. Additional development was proposed in 1969 but this plan met stiff opposition from several Native American tribes and this plan was put on hold until 1980 when the Forest Service approved a new lodge, a paved road, expanded parking, four new ski lifts and 50 acres (200,000 m2) of trails to be added to the existing ski area. The opposition tried unsuccessfully to convince the courts that the existence of the ski area would prevent them from practicing their religion. The ski area which occupies only about 3% of the San Francisco Peaks made the Forest Service approved changes and had existed in relative peace until they decided to add snowmaking to the area. This new, much needed improvement drew the attention of both the Native American opposition and some environmentalist groups who have joined forces to fight the Snowbowl. The new expanded opposition was citing the use of treated waste water to make snow as both environmentally unsafe and a serious assault on the “sacred San Francisco Peaks”.

 

With this most recent round of legal battles over, (I hope) the Arizona Snowbowl will now be able to start construction of their snowmaking system. Unfortunately with insufficient time remaining this year these improvements will have to wait until the spring of 2010. I think it is unfortunate that reasonable people on both sides of the issue were not able to come to a workable solution years ago, and avoided the spending of hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal fees, money which could have been put to much better uses.

 

Congratulations to the Arizona Snowbowl and the US Forest Service for successfully fighting this battle and upholding the multi use concept that allows our public lands to be used for a variety of recreational activities as well as the practice of religious ceremonies.

 

 

US SUPREME COURT RULES IN FAVOR OF SNOWMAKING!

                                                                                                                                                                                                         By way of: www.arizonasnowbowl.com

By way of:  www.savethepeaks.org

By way of: www.firsttracksonline.com

Ok so they did not exactly rule in favor of snowmaking, but what the U.S. Supreme Court did do was to refused to review a ruling by the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco in favor of Arizona Snowbowl outside of Flagstaff, affirming a U.S. Forest Service decision to allow the ski area to make snow for the first time in its 71-year history.

The Snowbowl which is located just outside of Flagstaff Arizona began life in the 1930s when the forest service allowed the construction of a ski lodge and access road on the western slopes of the San Francisco Peaks. Additional development was proposed in 1969 but this plan met stiff opposition from several Native American tribes and this plan was put on hold until 1980 when the Forest Service approved a new lodge, a paved road, expanded parking, four new ski lifts and 50 acres (200,000 m2) of trails to be added to the existing ski area. The opposition tried unsuccessfully to convince the courts that the existence of the ski area would prevent them from practicing their religion. The ski area which occupies only about 3% of the San Francisco Peaks made the Forest Service approved changes and had existed in relative peace until they decided to add snowmaking to the area. This new, much needed improvement drew the attention of both the Native American opposition and some environmentalist groups who have joined forces to fight the Snowbowl. The new expanded opposition was citing the use of treated waste water to make snow as both environmentally unsafe and a serious assault on the “sacred San Francisco Peaks”.

With this most recent round of legal battles over, (I hope) the Arizona Snowbowl will now be able to start construction of their snowmaking system. Unfortunately with insufficient time remaining this year these improvements will have to wait until the spring of 2010. I think it is unfortunate that reasonable people on both sides of the issue were not able to come to a workable solution years ago, and avoided the spending of hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal fees, money which could have been put to much better uses.

Congratulations to the Arizona Snowbowl and the US Forest Service for successfully fighting this battle and upholding the multi use concept that allows our public lands to be used for a variety of recreational activities as well as the practice of religious ceremonies.

 

Skiers and snowboarders made a strong showing for the 2007/2008 season.

 

Based on research that was in part funded by: Sporting Goods Manufacturing Association, the Outdoor Industry Association, the National Golf Foundation, the U.S. Tennis Association and others it would seem that 10 million Americans did go skiing and 7 million snowboarders went riding during the 2007/2008 season. This research was used to help discover what type of sports skiers and boarders cross over to when they are not at their favorite resort.

 

35% of alpine skiers and 32% of snowboard riders also ride road bikes

15% of alpine skiers also cross country ski while 41% of cross country skiers participate in alpine skiing

37% of snowboard riders participated in camping

37% of alpine skiers are also runners

Just 12% of alpine skiers and 16% of snowboard riders also ride a mountain bike

23% of alpine skiers, 25% of cross country skiers and 26% of snowboard riders play ping pong at least once each year

 

I was a little surprised at the ping pong numbers but what the heck a little exercise like that could go a long ways toward keeping in shape for the next ski trip! There was no mention of beer pong which I would have thought might have had more participants than the ping variety.

 

This survey also indicated that “8.5 million Americans identify themselves as skiers or riders but did not participate in snow sports during the 2007/08 season.  Most indicated that lack of time was the principal reason for their lapse in participation and they plan on participating again in the future.” Come on you guys get off the couch!!

 

Federal Government may help pay for your next pair of skis or snowboard!

 

Congress is currently considering The Personal Health Investment Today Act (H.R. 2105), also known as PHIT, this legislation would allow for reimbursement of physical activity expenses using pre-tax dollars, including the purchase of products that are directly related specifically to snow sports activities including skis and snowboards. Outerwear would be considered too generic and would not qualify.

 

If you would like to write off a big chunk of the cost of your next pair of skis or snowboard you should go to: www.getphit.sgma.com to voice your support for this legislation.

 

If you need more incentive than reducing the cost of your next winter sports piece of equipment then consider what congress is using for the rationale behind this legislation. Reducing the cost of physical activity will encourage healthier lifestyles which will lower health care costs. “PHIT would allow taxpayers to place up to $2,000 a year in existing pre-tax medical accounts for reimbursement of physical activity expenses; lower costs will promote active lifestyles and improve the health of Americans.”

 

I’ll vote for that! And I hope you will too.

 

Original Article Posted at : http://www.examiner.com/x-12453-Phoenix-Skateboarding-Examiner~y2009m6d7-Skate-shop-hero

With the economy doing poorly and businesses great and small falling under ever increasing economic pressure, it is no small wonder that skate shops are suffering. Popular names such as Alliance and smaller, local shops like Curbside both falter and then fall in light of monetary difficulties. However, that’s not to say that some places aren’t doing well throughout these trying times.

Skaters all over need a place to purchase boards, hardware, stickers and their favorite colored grip tape, despite these missing shops. Someone has to fill that gap and Ski Pro manages to do so with interesting results. Located on 21st street and Camelback, your first impression is that the place is cool, current and energetic but what does it have to do with skating? Quite a bit, it turns out.

Tucked away in the back corner of the store is a section devoted to skateboarding. The back wall is plastered with a small selection of boards, several of which are local companies like Old Man Army: boards designed for the 35+ skate scene and bearing unique, original designs, or Zombie: boards that are more like your traditional deck layout. Ski Pro keeps their own distributor decks here, too called Homicide and they’ve got a selection of blanks that will make your jaw drop.

The shop may be out of the way but it is well worth the visit. Here’s one reason. Their blanks start at $16.95 and their own Homicides at a mere $29.95. After putting it all together it was possible to make a complete board for $43.28 after tax; this included wheels, trucks, bearings, grip, the deck. Everything. For those who don’t know, that’s less than the price of a standard name brand deck- and nothing else. Furthermore Ski Pro provides modest support for local skate companies and even carries AZ Steez (a regional Skateboarding magazine).

This doesn’t mean that skaters can’t pick up more popular name brands like Creature or Plan B, articles of clothing or backpacks. But shoes were no where in site. With that said, it seems like Ski Pro has a small but worthwhile assortment of skateboarding supplies, a friendly, knowledgeable staff and great deals. So go check them out. You might be surprised at what you find.

 

This is a video description of the differences between regular camber snowboards and reverse camber (banana, rocker) snowboards and the benefits of each, brought to you by SKIPRO

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